"UP IN THE CHEAP SEATS"

Theatre yesterday and today

 

 

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GENTLEMAN JIMMY

When my son texted me yesterday with the message: "Very sad news, James Karen died at 94," it was not unexpected, but it still made me stop in my tracks while walking down Broadway. And I know that Jimmy, as he was known to all his friends, would have liked that I was "on the street where he lived," since—let's face it—back in his day, Broadway was Broadway! Ironically, even though he spent years working between 41st and 65th Street, it wasn't where he became a famous face: that was film, television and oh my god so many commercials. Between the late 1960s into the ’80s, Jimmy was "the Pathmark Man," spokesman for the now-defunct Pathmark chain of grocery stores, appearing in hundreds of spo

SATURDAY THE 13th

This column is modified from another version, published two years ago, 9.20.16. In 1950, the great Japanese director Akira Kurosawa helmed and co-wrote (with Shinobu Hashimoto) the film Rashomon, which featured a device involving its main characters’ telling different versions of the plot’s inciting incident. The alternately self-serving and contradictory stories they tell have made the term Rashomon effect commonplace to this day. With today being the 57th anniversary of the opening night on Broadway of Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, it brought to mind a symposium sponsored by the Dramatists Guild of America many years ago, which featured the Rashomon effect to, well ... gr

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© 2016 Ron Fassler - All rights Reserved

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